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Thread: Keep an EYE on it... a collection of techniques

  1. #1
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    Default Keep an EYE on it... a collection of techniques

    Here is a way to make a very realistic iris on a maria.

    You need:
    - a rod of white glass
    - scrap from browns, greens or blues
    - clear glass
    - black glass
    - punties if you prefer them for pulling cane
    - tweezers
    - graphite marver
    - the skills to make an "implosion" like operation

    Start with some prep-work: Heat the end of youe punty (or an opaque rod of your color theme) and add assorted bits of glass from that color group untill the blob is about 2cm in diameter. Pull into an about 3-5mm thick cane (rod or stringer ; ) and let it cool.

    To start the project itself make a blob of about 12mm diameter on a white rod and "stomp" it on your graphite marver to get a flat bottom. Take your striped cane and draw a line of dots on the edge of your maria. Don't let any gap or better add a second layer to this "dam" if needed. Heat the front side and the edge of the maria to melt the "dam" and guide it with the heat to the center. The surface has a lentil shape after this. If the color is not fully moved to the center touch it with a stringer and pull a thread of glass away to give space for the color to come closer. Heat the center again to flatten any bump left by that pulling action. The last step is adding a black dot for the pupil. The eye is finished, but you can add a clear encasing for a more realistic optic.

    This element can be used for ringtops or carbochons. It can be incorporated into bigger work if tranferred to a clear punty before detaching it from the white rod. You can make the whole operation in reverse by working on a clear maria and drawing the pupil before imploding the color. This is more challenging...



    Invitation: If you have an other "view" on the eye-topic please add your version here, too.
    Last edited by Kuehlmorgen_D; 07-07-2013 at 05:23 AM.

  2. #2
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    Default

    Very cool. This sounds like something that I can try out and use in one of my micro mosaic faces too.

    Thanks!!
    Lori Greenberg

  3. #3
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    Default The iris cane for smaller eyes

    This is a striped cane for smaller eyes in the masced dot technique.

    You need:
    - a rod of sky blue
    - a fat stringer (3mm diameter) lapis cobalto
    - punties for puling cane (glass or metal)
    - colored glass to make a face bead
    - marver or paddle, tweezers


    And again we do little prep work: Make a gather from the sky blue and roll it into a cylinder of about 1cm in diameter. Draw lengthwise lines with the lapis stringer and leave about the same space between the lines as they are wide (or little more). Heat and pull into a ca. 4mm diameter cane.

    While that cane is cooling make a new gather from sky blue like before. Now draw lengthwise lines with the previous prepared cane. Cover the whole surface without gaps to get as many lines as possible. Hest it up and pull into diameters between 2mm and 4mm or what you prefer to draw an iris in one dot.


    When you make a face bead and you already got the white eye balls with outline and texture our cane comes into the scene. Heat the very end of it and pluck the first bit away with your tweezers to concentrate the lines in the center. The point should be pretty short and blunt. Here comes the important moment: Heat the first diameter in length and push it into the right place, pull it immeadetly and quick away. Pluck the thread short with the tweezers and melt it in as you do with a dot from a plain colored rod. Melt it slow and carefull down to keep the lines straight to the center. The iris has a lot of details more than one with plain color only. Continue by adding the pupil and, if needed, a clear lens abouve the iris.


    This adds more details to smaller eyes without much additional work. If the colors are different (red plus yellow...) this cane is usefull for dasyflower-types. Play with it!
    Last edited by Kuehlmorgen_D; 07-07-2013 at 05:20 AM.

  4. #4
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    Default Eye-murrini with front and sides pattern

    This is a murrini that makes it's final pattern with the front and the sides while melted in.

    You need:
    - rods of sky blue, black and clear for endcaps
    - a fat stringer (3mm diameter) lapis cobalto
    - punties for puling cane (glass or metal)
    - colored glass to make a face bead
    - marver or paddle, tweezers

    We start with the prepwork as the last project to make a far striped stringer with lapis cobalto stripes on sky blue.

    While that cane (stringer) is coling we shape a black gather into a cylinder of 1cm diameter. This cylinder gets a one layer coating of the sky blue as used in the prepwork. Now comes one layer coating with the prepared striped cane to cover the whole surface with lengthwise stripes. Push the cane against the heat to form a 45° angle to the painted trail and the stripes are spreading in the hidden front and concentrating in the visible back. When the whole surface is covered with fine stripes add clear caps to the ends, heat up and pull into 3...6mm diameter.

    Cut the cold cane into sections of 1/2 to 2/3 length of it's diameter. (Make a bead and...) Heat up a spot where to place the murrina, preheat the murina and put it into place. Now heat more the surrounding area than the face of your murrina and let it sink into the surface. Cooling the face and pushing it into the bead will keep the pupil wider.



    For flower canes replace the black by yellow and use other contrasting colors for the striped cane in the prep work.

  5. #5
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    Default

    Hi Lori

    This implosion technique produces an iris of 1/2" in diameter (minnimum). That size sounds not so "micro" to me since I visited the micromosaics class at the 2010 gathering. But wait for the next addition(s) to this thread, the "striated iris cane" to be incorporated into more complex murrini canes.

    I incorporated three diferent canes into my project: A chery blossom cane, an apple cane and my signature cane. The contributing patterned tiles (fiali ?) have to fit with the average diameter of the surrounding area. If there is a millstone between pebbles there is a disharmony, eaven if the colors and the picture will fit. If you use the contributing canes for my next project, you'll break down the "tiles" by more than 1/3 in diameter and it will fit better with the other "tiles".


    Dietmar
    Last edited by Kuehlmorgen_D; 07-09-2013 at 07:23 AM.

  6. #6
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    Default Streaky iris cane for face murrini

    This cane has a natural iris pattern and just one contributing pull.


    You need:
    - black, white and assorted blue opaque glass
    - clear glass for endcaps
    - punties (glass or metal)
    - rodnippers, tweezers, graphite paddle, bbq-masher
    - vermiculite or preheated oven
    - preheating facility for glass bits


    To make the pattern more random cut from the assorted blue rods sections of about 2cm and have a good mix of light, medium and dark bits. Preheat the end of a punty (or a blue rod) and stick the bits on that gather. Melt everything into a bubble free gather of about 2,5-3cm in diameter. Attach a second punty to that gather and pull slightly to be able to do a Z-fold. Give the whole thing about two or three turns like a twisty and push it back into a round shape. Transfer one punty to the equator (we are pulling with reversed axis) and remove the other one. Peel off the less striated areas from the old punty ends with your tweezers. After heating the whole gather press it from the old punty ends to get a rectandular or trapezoid crosssection. Attach the second punty, heat and pull with a final width of 7-8mm and 3-4mm thickness. Let it cool and cut into 3cm sections.


    The prep work is done. We start with a 6mm rod of black glass and coat it with a thin layer of medium blue or the ends of the contributing pull before (reshaped into a regular rod diameter). This keeps the pupil round while melting the air out of the block, later. We have two ways to assemble the iris pattern:

    The cold way assembles the striated parts around the pupil and secures them with thick aluminium foil into a bundle. If your crossection is trapezoid put the short edge to the inside. This bundle is preheated in an oven and picked up with a molten gather of clear glass for the first end cap.

    The hot way assembles the individually preheated striated parts around the pupil to form the same pattern as we practiced in the cold setup. Keep the gaps as narrow as possible and support the freshly attached parts with some clear glass.

    Once everything is assembled add enough clear glass (for the second end cap) in a star shape to the open end to leave enough space for the air to escape. Add a clear cap to the punty side, if nececcary. After attaching a second punty to the open end start heating up at the closed clear cap. You have to heat the bundle to allmost liquid down to the core to "chase" the air out of the gaps and get a bubble free block. Move the hot zone slowly to the end with the star shaped cap. Pushing and pulling motions support the process of closing the gaps. Slightly twisting motions can help as well, but they can distort the pattern if they are too large and not removed immeadetly. Reshape the block into a cylinder and coat the surface with one layer of clear glass. Once the whole thing is heated up you can pull it into the wanted diameter. Depending on the final diameter cool the sections into vermiculite or a preheated oven.



    You can use these murrini on beads, as contributing parts in more complex canes or in mosaics. The leftovers of the contributing cane can go into the next repitition of this project and the endcaps will make great spacers.

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