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Thread: Reduced Glass Surfaces

  1. #11
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    Thanks again so very much, Robert. I find this to be very interesting, as you know, but I really feel it's important to get this out to as many lampworkers as possible. It confirms a supposition some of us have had and hopefully will promote more people to take a second look at their ventilation.

  2. #12
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    Hi Robert

    Thank you for the really interesting article. It concentrates more on lead and solver in the glass. Did you find any information about Cadmium? This element is a potential hazard for the beadmaker and the user of the beads, too. It reduces in the flame and the metallic cadmium will evaporate in the flame. But there is allways a gray residue on the glass from the not evaporated cadmium. Zink is, in my opinion, not so dangerous because it's toxic concentration is much higher than from cadmium.

    Cadmium (and zink) is in all bright yellow, orange and red colors in the Effetre glass. There are very few cases of combinations from cadmium and lead in glass, mostly in low firing enamels. The reason for cadmium OR lead is the sulfide and selenide, used as the anion in the colorant. It will react to black lead sulfide.

    Dietmar


    PS: Glass is a lot of inorganic chemistry in a nonaquous solvent, heavy metals included.

  3. #13
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    I haven't worked much with the yellows and reds (aside from rubino) yet. I know that the Cd is there but have not had the time to explore that area. With the recent developments involving the use of Cd to replace the Pb that was being used in toys and other products manufactured off shore it is moving up my 'to do' list.

    My lab has been closed for over 3 months and I'm just now getting the instruments back on line, so I'm hoping to get back to some of this work soon. I describe glass as an inorganic, non-crystalline solid with dopants added for color.

    Robert
    Robert Simmons
    Director for Bead Donations
    Beads of Courage, Inc.

  4. #14
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    Wow - Robert, thank you very much for this information!

  5. #15
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    Robert, thank you for conducting this valuable research and publishing your findings!

    Might it be alright with you if I post a link to your article on Lampwork Etc. and The Melting Pot?

    Best,
    Chris
    Christine Hansen
    www.christinehansen.com

  6. #16
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    Hi Chris,
    There is already a thread in the Safety forum on LE that refers to the MT article, I don't have a problem with your posting to MP. I have been in touch with ISGB and I am working with them to put a similar article in the Glass Bead magazine. It will also be published on the ISGB website as information to all. When that is completed, I am certain that ISGB will post that link in many resources so everyone in the glass community can have access to the information.

    Robert
    Robert Simmons
    Director for Bead Donations
    Beads of Courage, Inc.

  7. #17
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    Great! Thanks so much Robert!
    Christine Hansen
    www.christinehansen.com

  8. #18
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    That sounds great, Robert. I'm so glad this will be available to all lampworkers.

  9. #19
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    Robert,

    thanks for doing this work. Thanks for emphasizing the need for good ventilation in lampworking and I don't think it can be said too often.

    As someone who specializes in "metallic" beads, often using the techniques you discuss here I found this fascinating. I note the strong lead peaks in several of the spectra and I note also the strong manganese peak. I'd have expected strong manganese peaks in some other glass types you did not test and some strong cadmium peaks in still others. Manganese, silver many of the other metals are not generally of very much concern, while lead and cadmium are.

    The lead peaks are of concern, not in my mind due to the inherent danger of lead absorption from the surfaces of glass beads, but because of the perceived danger of such absorption by those in our litigious society who are inclined to sue any and all about anything where they think a settlement can be reached, justified or not. I think this should put those who make and sell such beads on notice that their art may indeed be the subject of litigation. If it were not wearable art then the danger would be less so, but given the nature of beads, I think it is only a matter of time, sad to say, before some attorney sees this as an opportunity.

    Again, thanks for the good work and for bringing the article to our attention.

    Vince

  10. #20
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    I haven't had the time to get into the cadmium glasses, but when I work with them I don't see much surface metal. The fuming aspects are another matter all together and I'm working on some experiments to show that better.

    I agree with your assessment of one of the primary hazards - litigation. The other, though, in my mind is the fate of the fumed metals that don't adhere to a bead and end up condensing out in the atmosphere. Here's the ventilation point - when they condense out you want them to be somewhere other than your living space. Adding heavy metals to house dust, even in small amounts, just doesn't appeal to me.

    Thanks much,
    Robert
    Robert Simmons
    Director for Bead Donations
    Beads of Courage, Inc.

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