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Thread: Osibin Lentil Marvered Beads

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
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    Default Osibin Lentil Marvered Beads

    Making Lentil Beads

    Maureen Kennedy


    Lentil Beads are a new phenomenon intriguing glass beadmakers. Lentil stands for the word Lenticular - meaning the bead is shaped like a lens with a dome top on both sides of the bead with thinner edges surrounding the circumference of the bead. A special marver has been made by Craig Millron of Arrowsprings, called the Osibin Marver, named after Kim Osibin who created this shape in her beads and inspired the creation of the marver.
    Like most glass bead makers, I just had to have the latest gadgetry to play with and create beads in this unusual form. It came with no instructions, and so I learned as I created. The marver contains 4 concave depressions in graphite, with which to make varying sizes of beads. The beads from these impressions end up being round, with some effort. But I found, you can also use it to make tabular beads have the same thinner edges to those beads as well.

    This is the first full set of beads I made, after my experimentation with others.



    The first thing I did was measure the concave holes with a caliper to determine it's height and width, which for the smallest hole was exactly 20 mm for both. After some experimentation, I found that I needed a width of 17 mm which would flatten into the 20 mm hole nicely.All beads were made on a Hothead with Propane fuel. The first step of the picture to the left, shows a 17 mm wrap, with an "inner tube" of additional glass to help me get the elliptical form I needed for the bead. I heated that well until the elliptical form was made, then cooled the bead to add additional glass to both ends. In this bead set, I used Effetre Dark Ivory for the base, Copper Green and Ink Blue for the side wraps. After melting in the side wraps, making sure that a line of ivory remained down the middle, and back into the elliptical shape, I then used silvered ivory stringer to rake and merge the colors, one drawn into the other, throughout the bead. Then the bead is heated until it is red hot, glowing, keeping it centered, and at the point you like the design, you firmly press it into the marver until it fills out the cavity and your bead is round on one side.

    You then reheat the bead, getting it glowing again, and press the other side of the bead into the cavity and while pushing it into the cavity you swirl the bead around, rocking the bead gently back and forth to help form the thinner edges to the bead.





    If you have found that you hesitated too long in pressing it into the marver, you may find that the bead is uncentered, with more glass on one side than the other. Just reheat the bead, twirling it till it rounds up again, and press into the mold again. I found that you should continue to heat and press into the marver, several times, with the rocking motion, in order to get the thinner edges. Sometimes you will need to lift the bead up on end, heating just the edge of the bead, and then pressing just the edges of the bead against the marver for thinner edges.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
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    381

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    Two additional graphite tool that can help you with the lentil bead, is marble and button molds. The marble molds can help you keep your ends round (for the two smallest marver impressions) , and the button mold has the same exact size for the smallest lentil shape with a flat depression which can help you get a round shape before heating the bead and pressing it into the lentil marver.





    My next set of beads, using this lentil marver, had a few unusual features besides the shape of the beads themselves.

    These beads had a base entirely of copper green Effetre glass. Using the same instructions as above, after the elliptical form I covered the bead in silver foil and burnished it onto the bead. Be careful not to burnish the foil all the way to the ends, as silver foil becomes hard silver with transparent glass on top of it and it will leave jagged ends to your beads that you cannot remove with diamond tip bead reamers. I then flashed the bead in the heat to quickly burn off the excess silver foil at the ends of the beads, but not long enough to melt the foil into the bead. Keeping the bead warm, I then wrapped vertically, specially prepared stringers consisting of light teal transparent that had massive amounts of Silver Blue transparent, Silver Blue and Silver green reduction frits melted into it. In pulling the stringers, the reduction frit created horizontal stripes in the stringer and created the varying colors you see in the beads.



    In wrapping the bead with these stringers, I left small spaces in between wraps. Some silver foil left on a bead that has been cool will not fully melt into the bead when it is reheated, so the effect of melted "silvered" copper green as well as uncovered unmelted silver will pop up through the transparent glass.





    While these beads were hot, they looked so green I was thinking of calling them Irish Moss. What a surprise when I took them out of the kiln and saw they went into the Aqua-Turquoise ranges from the copper green and the reduction frit. The spacers are simply dark aqua transparent tabs, with silver foil on both sides that have been encased.So after one week of working with this marvelous new tool, I am anxiously looking forward to what other new creations I can make!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
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    381

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    Corina Tettinger selected these beads to put on the cover of her Spotlight Magazine! Here is the picture she took of them with her fabulous camera!



    CC 06/17/2003 Maureen Kennedy -Not to be published nor maintained electronically on any other person's website without my permission. I give permission to ISGB to have this tutorial for individual use only.


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