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Thread: melting point soft glass

  1. #1
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    Default melting point soft glass

    My google search didnot give me an answer.
    Can anybody tell me what the melting point of soft glass is?

    Thank you, Folks!

    Marlein
    www.bong.nl

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by marlein
    Can anybody tell me what the melting point of soft glass is?
    Which type of soft glass? Effetre's (COE 104) softening point is: 1050º F and it's working temperature is: 1400º F

    If you're talking about a different COE, then the numbers will be different.

    Also, it doesn't have a melting point, per say, because it is glass (always fluid.)


    Wes.

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    Default Marlein

    thank you WEs,



    Can you tell me more about that glass has no melting point, but always fluid?
    I don't understand that.


    Marlein

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    By definition, glass has no crystalline structure and so is an "amorphous solid" (sometimes referred to as a liquid) have no specific melting temperature.

    Rather than an actual meting point, glass becomes more viscous the warmer it gets.

    You can read more about glass as a liquid here (and probably in your native language, as well!):

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glass#Glass_as_a_liquid


    Regards,
    Wes.

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    Wes,

    actually glass (and all solids and fluids) beome LESS viscous with temperature increase. That is they become more fluid as temperature rises and less resistant to shear forces. It's an inverse relationship. For gases the relationship is inverted and gasses become more viscous with temperature increase. Weird, no?

    Vince

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vince
    actually glass (and all solids and fluids) beome LESS viscous with temperature increase. That is they become more fluid as temperature rises and less resistant to shear forces. It's an inverse relationship. For gases the relationship is inverted and gasses become more viscous with temperature increase. Weird, no?
    Hmmm, I think that it's a language problem. Now that you point this out, I recall that viscosity means the resistance to flow, but when thinking/talking I think of viscosity as meaning fluidity. Obviously this is wrong, though

    Thanks for pointing this out!

  7. #7
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    Wes,

    I knew what you meant, and knew you really understood the concept, but others might not have. Yeah, fluidity and viscosity, expressed the way you described, are actually inverses of one another. Less viscous is more fluid; more viscous is less fluid - except for gases.

    Vince

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    And then there is vicious glass -- like EDP.....but that's a whole 'nuther topic...

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    I have not finished reading all the posts yet, but would like to interject that the relationship between COE (more properly CTE) and softening point is not a necessary connection.

  10. #10
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    It is also important to note that traditionally glass has been considered as a liquid with solid properties. Current thought, however, is that glass is actually a solid with liquid properties.

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